The history of helium production

History Scientific discoveries The first evidence of helium was observed on August 18,as a bright yellow line with a wavelength of The line was detected by French astronomer Jules Janssen during a total solar eclipse in GunturIndia.

The history of helium production

HELIUM PRODUCTION | The Handbook of Texas Online| Texas State Historical Association (TSHA)

Helium Background Helium is one of the basic chemical elements. In its natural state, helium is a colorless gas known for its low density and low chemical reactivity. It is probably best known as a non-flammable substitute for hydrogen to provide the lift in blimps and balloons.

Because it is chemically inert, it is also used as a gas shield in robotic arc welding and as a non-reactive atmosphere for growing silicon and germanium crystals used to make electronic semiconductor devices.

Liquid helium is often used to provide the extremely low temperatures required in certain medical and scientific applications, including superconduction research.

Using spectrometers, which separate light into different bands of color depending on the elements present, they both observed a band of yellow light that could not be identified with any known element. News of their findings reached the scientific world on the same day, and both men are generally credited with the discovery.

Lockyer suggested the name helium for the new element, derived from the Greek word helios for the sun. InEnglish chemist Sir William Ramsay found that cleveite, a uranium mineral, contained helium. Cleve and Nils Langlet made a similar discovery at about the same time.

The history of helium production

This was the first time helium had been identified on Earth. Tests of other natural gas sources around the world yielded widely varying concentrations of helium, with the highest concentrations being found in the United States.

During the early s, the development of lighter-than-air blimps and dirigibles relied almost entirely on hydrogen to provide lift, even though it was highly flammable.

During World War I, the United States government realized that non-flammable helium was superior to hydrogen and declared it a critical war material. Production was tightly controlled, and exports were curtailed. Inthe United States passed the first Helium Conservation Act which prohibited the sale of helium to nongovernmental users.

Started in 1925 in the United States

During World War II, helium became a critical war material again. One of its more unusual uses was to inflate the tires on long-range bomber aircraft. The lighter weight of helium allowed the plane to carry lb 70 kg of extra fuel for an extended range.

After the war, demand for helium grew so rapidly that the government imposed the Helium Act Amendments in to purchase and store the gas for future use. Bythe demand had leveled off and the helium storage program was canceled. A few years later, the government started storing helium again.

As ofthere were about 35 billion cubic feet 1. Today, the majority of the helium-bearing natural gas sources are within the United States.

Canada, Poland, and a few other countries also have significant sources. Raw Materials Helium is generated underground by the radioactive decay of heavy elements such as uranium and thorium. Part of the radiation from these elements consists of alpha particles, which form the nuclei of helium atoms.

Some of this helium finds its way to the surface and enters the atmosphere, where it quickly rises and escapes into space. The rest becomes trapped under impermeable layers of rock and mixes with the natural gases that form there.The Helium is filled into liquid containers, gas cylinders and cylinder packs as necessary.

History of Helium Production. Government involvement in helium conservation dates to the Helium Act of which authorized the Bureau of Mines to build and operate a .

Helium production in the United States totaled 73 million cubic meters in The US was the world's largest helium producer, providing 40 percent of world supply. The US was the world's largest helium producer, providing 40 percent of world supply.

Oct 09,  · Helium production in the United States totaled 73 million cubic meters in The US was the world's largest helium producer, providing 40 percent of world supply.

In addition, the US federal government sold 30 million cubic meters from storage.

The Navajo-Chambers represented the only area in the history of the helium industry that had experienced sustained exploration and development for helium gas alone. In , Kipling Petroleum Company discovered Helium on Pinta Dome in when it drilled the # 1 Macie in search of oil. Helium production in the United States totaled 73 million cubic meters in The US was the world's largest helium producer, providing 40 percent of world supply. In addition, the US federal government sold 30 million cubic meters from storage. Production: Although Helium is one of the most common elements in the universe it is a rare gas on earth. It exists in the atmosphere in such small quantities (less than five parts per million) that recovering it from the air is uneconomical.

Other major helium producers were Algeria and Qatar. History Scientific discoveries. The first evidence of helium was observed on August 18, , By , increases in helium production in Qatar (under the company RasGas managed by Air Liquide) had increased Qatar's fraction of .

HELIUM heartoftexashop.com, a light, nonflammable, chemically inert gas, was first produced in Texas from the natural gases of the Petrolia oilfield, in Clay County, during World War heartoftexashop.commental plants were constructed in that area by the Bureau of Mines with funds allotted by the Army and Navy Departments to obtain nonexplosive helium .

Helium production in the United States totaled 73 million cubic meters in The US was the world's largest helium producer, providing 40 percent of world supply. In addition, the US federal government sold 30 million cubic meters from storage.

Helium: History, Production, Uses - SchoolWorkHelper